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vspaerotutorial [2018/03/10 14:02]
jgravett Updates VSPAERO GUI Images
vspaerotutorial [2018/04/01 14:41] (current)
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 ===== Getting Started ===== ===== Getting Started =====
-Once you have an appropriately defined model that you would like to analyze (see [[vspaeromodeling|Modeling for VSPAERO]]), you will need to generate a degenerate geometry filegenerate a setup fileand define any additional parameters to be considered.  The process begins with DegenGeom.\\ +Once you have an appropriately defined model that you would like to analyze (see [[vspaeromodeling|Modeling for VSPAERO]]), you will need to generate a degenerate geometry file if running the vortex lattice method or a Cart3D ​ surface triangulation file if running the panel method. You will then need to generate a setup file and define any additional parameters to be considered. \\ 
  
 ==== DegenGeom File ==== ==== DegenGeom File ====
-Degenerate geometry files are representations of three dimensional models in progressively simple frames. ​ For example, a three dimensional model is represented in its entirety, followed by a flat-plate representation,​ followed by a stick representation. ​ More detail on degenerate geometry can be found [[http://​www.openvsp.org/​wiki/​lib/​exe/​fetch.php?​media=degen_geom.pdf|here]] in the 2013 OpenVSP workshop presentation by Rob McDonald of CalPoly. ​ These files can be used in several different physical applications such as Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and vortex lattice solvers.\\ ​+The degenerate geometry file is required if running VSPAERO'​s vortex lattice solver. ​Degenerate geometry files are representations of three dimensional models in progressively simple frames. ​ For example, a three dimensional model is represented in its entirety, followed by a flat-plate representation,​ followed by a stick representation. ​ More detail on degenerate geometry can be found [[http://​www.openvsp.org/​wiki/​lib/​exe/​fetch.php?​media=degen_geom.pdf|here]] in the 2013 OpenVSP workshop presentation by Rob McDonald of CalPoly. ​ These files can be used in several different physical applications such as Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and vortex lattice solvers.\\ ​
  
 It is important to note that DegenGeom will write ALL of the components in a model unless you specify a geometry set!  The degenerate geometry files for your selected set of components are written from OpenVSP either by choosing ''​**DegenGeom**''​ under the ''​**Analysis**''​ menu or by opening the ''​**VSPAERO**''​ GUI and clicking ''​**Launch Solver**''​. ​ This will write a comma separated value (.CSV) file and a MATLAB (.M) file.  VSPAERO is primarily concerned with the CSV file.  If you choose, you can open these files in a code viewer (in the case of the CSV you may use Excel or similar) and see all of the points that describe a component. ​ A free, open-source code editor that is commonly used is [[https://​notepad-plus-plus.org/​ |Notepad ++]]. In addition, the ''​**Preview VLM Geometry**''​ button on the Overview tab of the GUI is available. \\  It is important to note that DegenGeom will write ALL of the components in a model unless you specify a geometry set!  The degenerate geometry files for your selected set of components are written from OpenVSP either by choosing ''​**DegenGeom**''​ under the ''​**Analysis**''​ menu or by opening the ''​**VSPAERO**''​ GUI and clicking ''​**Launch Solver**''​. ​ This will write a comma separated value (.CSV) file and a MATLAB (.M) file.  VSPAERO is primarily concerned with the CSV file.  If you choose, you can open these files in a code viewer (in the case of the CSV you may use Excel or similar) and see all of the points that describe a component. ​ A free, open-source code editor that is commonly used is [[https://​notepad-plus-plus.org/​ |Notepad ++]]. In addition, the ''​**Preview VLM Geometry**''​ button on the Overview tab of the GUI is available. \\ 
 +
 +==== Cart3D File ====
 +In order to execute VSPAERO'​s panel method solver, the geometry set must be described in the Cart3D *.tri surface triangulation format. In the VSPAERO GUI, this is done automatically if the ''​**Panel Method**''​ toggle is selected under "Case Setup" on the Overview tab. On the Advanced tab, the file name and directory of the *.tri will be listed next to the ''​**Panel**''​ label under "​Advanced Case Setup"​. Clicking ''​**Launch Solver**''​ will generate a Cart3D mesh of the geometry set. However, if a MeshGeom has already been created through the OpenVSP GUI, it will be deleted before a new one is generated.
 +
 +If running VSPAERO'​s panel solver through the command line, additional methods are available to generate a *.tri file. An intersected Cart3D mesh can also be output from the CFD Mesh GUI. Generating the *.tri file through the CFD Mesh GUI allows for more advanced mesh control, for which more information can be found on the [[cfdmesh|OpenVSP CFD Meshing Guide]]. An unintersected Cart3D mesh can be generated by opening the Export GUI from the ''​**File**''​ drop-down, indicating the desired export set, and clicking ''​**Cart3D (.tri)**''​. For a more in-depth guide to Cart3D file generation in OpenVSP, see [[meshoverview|VSP Mesh Generation for Cart3D Guide]].
  
 ==== Setup File ==== ==== Setup File ====
-**//You MUST have a DegenGeom file written to perform this step in OpenVSP!//​**\\ ​+**//You MUST have a DegenGeom ​or Cart3D ​file written to perform this step in OpenVSP!//​**\\ ​
  
-Now that your model has an associated DegenGeom file, you can begin writing your setup file.  VSPAERO recognizes this file by the name ''​modelname_DegenGeom.vspaero''​. ​ This can be done several ways, some of which are faster and more accurate than others. ​ The Setup file must be in the same directory as the DegenGeom file for VSPAERO to successfully launch. ​ Note that the following descriptions use the VSP coordinate system.\\ ​+Now that your model has an associated DegenGeom/​Cart3D ​file, you can begin writing your setup file.  VSPAERO recognizes this file by the name ''​modelname_DegenGeom.vspaero'' ​if running the vortex lattice method and ''​modelname.vspaero''​ if running the panel method.  This can be done several ways, some of which are faster and more accurate than others. ​ The Setup file must be in the same directory as the DegenGeom/​Cart3D ​file for VSPAERO to successfully launch. ​ Note that the following descriptions use the VSP coordinate system.\\ ​
  
 If you are using VSPAERO from the Command Prompt window, you are able to write some of the setup information into a file associated with your model. ​ This process is covered in the [[vspaerotutorial#​VSPAERO from Command Prompt Window|VSPAERO from Command Prompt Window]] section.\\ ​ If you are using VSPAERO from the Command Prompt window, you are able to write some of the setup information into a file associated with your model. ​ This process is covered in the [[vspaerotutorial#​VSPAERO from Command Prompt Window|VSPAERO from Command Prompt Window]] section.\\ ​
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 In the ''​**Overview**''​ tab, you'll find several different sliders and inputs that will help you define a Setup file.  More detail in the use of this console is covered in the [[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=G96O-YLZAGg|"​Introduction to VSPAERO"​]] video. ​ Once each value is defined for the flow conditions to be analyzed, click the ''​**Launch Solver**''​ button to automatically generate the Setup file and run VSPAERO.\\ ​ In the ''​**Overview**''​ tab, you'll find several different sliders and inputs that will help you define a Setup file.  More detail in the use of this console is covered in the [[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=G96O-YLZAGg|"​Introduction to VSPAERO"​]] video. ​ Once each value is defined for the flow conditions to be analyzed, click the ''​**Launch Solver**''​ button to automatically generate the Setup file and run VSPAERO.\\ ​
 If you view the *.vspaero file, you should see that most of the values have been written in.  However if you want to conduct a more detailed analysis you must further specify the values in the file and run VSPAERO through the command line or an external script. ​ Reynolds number, density, Vinf, among others are not written for you.\\ ​ If you view the *.vspaero file, you should see that most of the values have been written in.  However if you want to conduct a more detailed analysis you must further specify the values in the file and run VSPAERO through the command line or an external script. ​ Reynolds number, density, Vinf, among others are not written for you.\\ ​
 +
 +==== Control Grouping ====
 +
 +VSPAERO allows for trimming of the vehicle’s control surface deflections by defining control surface groups in the the VSPAERO setup file. This is facilitated by the Control Grouping tab of the VSPAERO GUI. The middle browser labeled “Available Control Surfaces” lists all rectangle and control surface sub-surfaces that can be added to a control surface group. They are named using the following convention: “GeomName_SurfaceName_Sub-SurfaceName”. If no control surface groups have been created, the middle browser will be empty. A control surface group is created by clicking the “Add” button under the left-most browser labeled “User Groups”. The group can then be renamed using the “Group Name” input. The desired control surfaces can be added to the group using the “Add Selected” or “Add All” buttons under the middle browser, moving them over to the right-most browser labeled “Grouped Control Surfaces”. A control surface can only be added to a group once, but a control surface can be added to multiple groups. When selected within a particular group, available control surfaces will be highlighted in red and those already added to the group will be highlighted in green. In addition, the button labeled “Auto Group Remaining Control Surfaces” will define control surface groups for all symmetric control surfaces still available. ​
 +
 +When a control group is selected, each control surface in the group will appear under the “Deflection Gains per Surface” divider. Here, the gains can be adjusted to allow for mixing of control surfaces within a group. For example, asymmetric aileron deflection or symmetric flap deflection. Note, the default value for all gains is 1, which will cause an asymmetric load distribution for a symmetric control surface group. On the Overview tab of the GUI, all control groups will be listed under the “Control Group Angles” divider. Each control group will have a toggle next to its name that determines if the group should be included in the VSPAERO run. If the toggle is selected, the deflection angle for the entire control group can be specified. ​
 +
 +{{ :​controlsurfgroup.png?​nolink&​900 |}}
  
 ===== Running VSPAERO ===== ===== Running VSPAERO =====
vspaerotutorial.1520719343.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/04/01 14:40 (external edit)